Local Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women to Celebrate Tenth Anniversary

Local Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women to Celebrate Tenth Anniversary

The Metropolitan Sun Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), are planning to celebrate
their tenth year of existence in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona. The public is invited to join NCNW on Saturday, March 4, from noon to 3 p.m. at the Pyle Adult Community Recreation Center, 655 E. Southern Ave, in Tempe to celebrate the anniversary and African American History Awareness Month. The group’s president Kathy
Kennard said, “We are honored to present flowers of appreciation to longtime busy

Carolyn Lowery

Carolyn Lowery

ess owner Mrs. Elizabeth White,
and longtime child, community, and Black family advocate Mrs. Carolyn Lowery. It is often stated and a long-standing sentiment ‘give someone their flowers’ while they can appreciate and smell them,” offered Kennard in sharing the organization’s decision to recognize White and Lowery. Kennard, who is responsible for charting and organizing the Metropolitan Sun chapter of NCNW upon her arrival in the state

 

a dozen years ago stated, “Black women from the days of Sojourner Truth, Harriett Tubman, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, all the way up to Rosa Parks and Shirley Chisholm, and beyond, have made a difference. “Our organization was founded to celebrate women, sisterhood, the community, and families. We are committed to continuing the work of our founder Mary McCloud Bethune, and later Dr. Dorothy Height and so many others that have cared enough about the community
to try to make a difference,” Kennard said. “There is no doubt, Mrs. White, who began her business in 1964 with a small load

Elizabeth White

Elizabeth White

from Dr. Lincoln and Mrs. Ragsdale, have endured many challenges in business but she and the business
are still here, still standing! A Black single woman ” said NCNW member Roberta Harris. “Mrs. Lowery, a single Black woman who cared enough about the safety and well-being of children in her neighborhood that she turned her own home in a haven of safety and later founded Kids Place. That is to be celebrated,” said Harris.  NCNW members emphasize two points: 1) African American women were also part of this country’s great development and have always been concerned and committed to “women’s rights” and often had to face acts of discrimination
because they were women and “women of color” as well (double standard). Nonetheless, they have persevered,
taking care of their families and working to strengthen and maintain home and community. 2) African American history while recognized in February, occurred every day, in every month of every year, from the time of Africans arrival in what is now America. For tickets and information contact, J. Goodwin (313) 410-9206 or Harris
(520) 426-1136.

 

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